Album: Momentum – Portraits of Women In Motion
Street Date: January 28th, 2019
Label: Smokin' Sleddog Records

Momentum – Portraits of Women In Motion brings together an ensemble of nationally-lauded female jazz artists including Rowe on piano alongside saxophonists Tia Fuller, Virginia Mayhew and Lisa Parrott, clarinetist Janelle Reichmanon, trumpeter Ingrid Jensen, trombonist Melissa Gardiner, bassists Marion Hayden and Marlene Rosenberg and drummer Allison Miller. Each composition on Momentum – Portraits of Women In Motion is a tribute to and musical portrait of several iconic female figures across the sectors of music, sports, social justice, environmental advocacy and politics. Rowe draws deserved recognition to her heroes with arrangements orchestrated for varying sizes of chamber jazz ensembles, from quartet to octet.

Amidst their touring schedule, this collective intends to collaborate with young female jazz students from all across the country. Rowe wants to give students the opportunity to play with her band and believes that by doing so, the young musicians will benefit greatly from this mentoring dynamic. The Ellen Rowe Octet will also host discussion groups devoted to issues of gender and sexuality in order to foster dialogue and empower these talented young women. Rowe enthuses, “while all of us move freely between male-led, female-led and mixed bands, it is a powerful experience to be together with other talented women and I’ve come to realize that many young women jazz musicians never get that experience, one that can prove to be life-changing for them”.

Momentum – Portraits of Women In Motion opens with “Ain’t I A Woman” - a hymn that remembers all of the unsung heroines of the civil rights movement including women like Septima Clark, Fannie Lou Hamer, Mary Bethune Cook, Daisy Bates and Rev. Dr. Pauli Murray. While “R.F.P. (Relentless Forward Progress)” was composed in honor of the great distance runners Joan Benoit Samuelson, Meghan “The Queen” Canfield Laws and Gunhild Swanson, “Game, Set and Match” pays tribute to Billie Jean King and Martina Navratilova. Both ladies fought endlessly for equal pay for women tennis players and led the way for future gay and lesbian athletes. Rowe remembers her dear friend and University of Michigan colleague, the late great pianist Geri Allen on “The Soul Keepers”. Reminiscent of both Allen’s stylings and that of one of her most significant influential figures, Mary Lou Williams, the track combines Mary Lou’s boogie-woogie style with some of Geri’s angular harmonies.

Drawn to folk-rock music, in addition to classical and jazz, from a young age, the pianist displays her appreciation for Carole King and Joni Mitchell, their melodic and harmonic sophistication and their powerful lyrics on “Anthem”. Referring to Michelle Obama as “the epitome of class and grace” as well as a very powerful role model for young women everywhere, the fifth track off the album, “The First Lady (No, Not You Melania)” was written immediately after Donald Trump’s inauguration in 2017. While “The Guardians” is Rowe’s heartfelt tribute to two of the staunchest protectors of animal rights and their environments, Jane Goodall and Dian Fossey, the album is brought to a close by a solo piano piece, “Song of the Meadowlark” - a composition which fondly remembers the composer’s mother. Having written the tune in Ucross, as well as been honored a residency at the Ucross Foundation, Rowe gifts this album closer to the Wyoming non-profit organization.

With the support of her talented ensemble, Rowe brings attention to the amazing women who have had a profound influence on her and celebrates their courage, talent, tenacity and grace on Momentum – Portraits of Women In Motion.

 

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GEORGE HARRIS
JAZZ WEEKLY
"Classy and alluring." Read the full review here.

JEROME WILSON
ALL ABOUT JAZZ
"This disc is a rich and absorbing collection of music. Ellen Rowe is a strong composer and knows how to arrange an octet to sound like a much bigger band." Read the full review here.

JACKSON SINNENBERG
JAZZTIMES
"...the Ellen Rowe Octet is one of the most expressive and compelling new groups you’ll hear this year." Read the full review here.

BILL MILKOWSKI
PASTE MAGAZINE
"The outstanding collection closes on an affecting note with Rowe’s wonderfully expressive solo piano piece, “Song of the Meadowlark.”" Read the full "Women Influencing the Future of Jazz" feature here

C. MICHAEL BAILEY
ALL ABOUT JAZZ
"The recording sports a thoughtful theme that lets it hang together on its own terms. What a great idea and realization!"  Read the full review here.

ERIC SNIDER
JAZZIZ 
"Rowe recruited nine ace musicians, gathered them in a studio on the UM campus and made an album by women, celebrating women, but not just for women. That’s no small feat." Read the full review here.

BLAINE SCHULTZ
SHEPHERD EXPRESS
"These are musicians at the top of their game, utilizing deep grooves and sophisticated arrangements."  Read the full review here.

DAVE SUMNER
BIRD IS THE WORM
"This is a recording that will snap into place with any time of day, any place, any mood, anything at all where you need something good to make everything better."  Read the full review here.

CHRIS MOSEY
ALL ABOUT JAZZ
"Musically, there's a lot to interest jazz fans of both genders here... some of whom may like to work out differences between the approach of female and male players, the traditional critical yardstick when judging women jazz musicians. " Full review here

SYDNEY HAWKINS
MICHIGAN NEWS
"The album features eight tracks, each an ode to women who have personally inspired her throughout the years."  Read the full review here.

MIKE CORNETTE
WUSF/NPR
Listen to the podcast here

DAN BILAWSKY
ALL ABOUT JAZZ
"While these songs feature standout players on today's scene, including alto saxophonist Tia Fuller, tenor saxophonist Virginia Mayhew, baritone saxophonist Lisa Parrott, trumpeter Ingrid Jensen, and, once again on drums, Allison Miller, it's Rowe who makes the project as successful as it is." Full review here

CHRIS SPECTOR
MIDWEST RECORD
" From civil rights to Joni Mitchell, Ringmistress Rowe brings together some damn immanent women jazzbos that show they might play different stuff but they know how to play together when it's called for." Read full review here

J.D. CONSIDINE
DOWNBEAT
"...for the listener, the experience is certainly life-enhancing." Read the full EDITORS PICK piece here.

 

STEWART SMITH
THE WIRE
"Rowe's deft synthesis sees her play artfully slanted melodies over the locomotive churn of her left hand..." Read the full review here.

NELSON BRILL
BOSTON CONCERT REVIEWS
"Rowe and her Octet are in soulful sparkling form!" Read the full review here.