FOR YOUR CONSIDERATION FOR THE 62nd GRAMMY AWARDS

BRIAN LYNCH BIG BAND - THE OMNI-AMERICAN BOOK CLUB  (HOLLISTIC MUSIC WORKS)


The Omni-American Book Club
Brian Lynch Big Band
Best Large Jazz Ensemble Album

"Crucible For Crisis"
Brian Lynch Big Band
Best Instrumental Composition

"The Struggle Is In Your Name"
Brian Lynch Big Band
Best Arrangement, Instrumental or A Cappella 

"The Struggle Is In Your Name"
Brian Lynch (Brian Lynch Big Band)
Best Improvised Jazz Solo

"The Struggle Is In Your Name"
Donald Harrison (Brian Lynch Big Band)
Best Improvised Jazz Solo

"Crucible For Crisis"
Dafnis Prieto (Brian Lynch Big Band)
Best Improvised Jazz Solo

"Crucible For Crisis"
Orlando "Maraca" Valle (Brian Lynch Big Band)
Best Improvised Jazz Solo

"This is an exciting big band album, one of the most fully realized you’ll hear this year or any year." - Glide Magazine

One of the most ambitious projects of his long and illustrious career, The Omni-American Book Club is an expansive album of music for large ensemble (“big band”) composed and arranged by Lynch and featuring his work as soloist alongside an all star cast of special guests including Regina CarterDonald Harrison, NEA Jazz Master Dave Liebman, GRAMMY® Award winner Dafnis PrietoOrlando “Maraca” Valle, and Jim Snidero. 

On The Omni-American Book Club, subtitled My Journey Through Literature In Music, Lynch connects his lifelong passion for reading and the books that have shaped his life with his original music. The album’s title refers directly to one of those books, The Omni-Americans by the African-American writer Albert Murray, which Lynch first read in high school soon after its initial release in 1970. Producer Kabir Sehgal writes in his liner notes: “…(Murray’s) life-affirming commentaries and provocative essays on culture and society are insightful and evergreen. His writings have served as a foundational philosophy for the jazz intelligentsia and aficionados alike… Murray holds up a mirror to American society and calls out the powers that be.” And indeed, reading Murray’s book and absorbing his thesis that black American culture was central to the whole idea of America was a key event in the budding, but already sharply defined, social consciousness of the young Lynch, even as he found himself being inexorably drawn to the study and practice of black American and other Afro-diasporic musics as his life’s work.