Brandee Younger Soul Awakening, Reviewed by Chloe McCormick, Black Grooves
Jazz harpist Brandee Younger’s latest album, Soul Awakening, has finally been released nearly seven years after its inception. The album’s eight tracks were recorded in 2012 by the Brandee Younger Quartet under the direction of bassist Dezron Douglas. Showcasing the ensemble’s aptitude for improvisation, spiritual jazz, and experimental music, the tracks include everything from Marvin Gaye’s “Save the Children” (featuring Niia) to album producer Dezron Douglas’s “Soulris,” reflecting the Brandee Younger Quartet’s passion for social justice and creative freedom. This album will also satisfy longtime Brandee Younger fans with covers of Dorothy Ashby’s “Games” and Alice Coltrane’s “Blue Nile,” two popular staples of Younger’s live performances. The remaining tracks are all originals by Younger, including “Respected Destroyer” (featuring Sean Jones on trumpet) and “Linda Lee,” a tribute to her mother.

Sam Newsome Chaos Theory: Song Cycles for Prepared Saxophone, Reviewed by Brenda Nelson-Strauss
Saxophonist and composer Sam Newsome is perhaps best known for pushing the envelope of his instrument, expanding the sound palette through a wide range of avant-garde techniques. His arsenal includes everything from electronic manipulation to multi-phonics and micro-tones to sound effects produced by percussive slap tonguing—all spliced into a multi-layered concoction that defies categorization. On Chaos Theory, Newsome goes one step further by augmenting his soprano sax with plastic tubes between the neck and mouthpiece, extending the range by two or more octaves. The album’s 15 tracks are representative of Newsome’s “improvisatory art music in which jazz functions more as a resource than a musical genre.” Many of the track titles portend what is to come, such as the Middle Eastern overtones of “Tel Aviv,” the increasingly frenetic sounds of “Marching Towards Insanity,” and mechanical drone underlying “Boiler Room Aesthetics.” Throughout, there are also tracks that fall within the more typical parameters of jazz, such as “Solo No. 1 (Naked Truth).” Chaos Theory should appeal to anyone interested in experimental music, especially those with a desire to tinker with instruments.

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