Dee Dee McNeil, Musical Memoirs

HENRY CONERWAY III – WITH PRIDE FOR DIGNITY

Henry Conerway III is a Detroiter, steeped in the blues. He studied with a dear friend of mine, trumpeter/educator, Marcus Belgrave. You can tell from the very first cut of this album, penned by legendary bassist, Ray Brown and titled, “Slippery” that this artist loves the blues. Kenny Banks Jr., sets the mood with his piano blues tones. Kevin Smith takes a tasty, extended solo on the double bass.

Conerway’s album title is taken from a tune composed by the trio’s pianist. The liner notes explain that “With Pride for Dignity,” is a nod to their ancestors and an affirmation of musical power in a world that too often denies or inhibits pride, dignity and humanity to people of African descent. So, there is a political overtone echoing from the CD title.

The second song on the album begins dramatically and then breaks into a 1920’s feel, reminding me of Scott Joplin or 1920’s jazz. Conerway uses his drum sticks to tap dance the rhythm beneath on his drum rims and cymbals. This song employs tempo changes and mood changes that make it sound almost like a suite of songs instead of just one composition. Before you can blink an eye, straight ahead jazz moves into the arrangement like a steamroller. The pace doubles and the instrumentation flies. Seven minutes later, the composition returns to a dramatic ballad and then to the 1920’s type jazz. It’s a journey of creativity and entertainment. “Sugar Ray” is a Phineas Newborn Jr. composition and once again, the arrangement is blues-soaked. Henry Conerway the third has composed one song on this album and I was eager to hear his cut #8, the last song on this album of fine music. It’s called “Carvin’s Agreement” and is named for one of his mentors, Michael Carvin. He performs the composition solo, which is somewhat rare. This rhythm execution gives the listener an ear to what this bandleader is all about. He explores his instrument generously. Conerway seems to be painting the song with sounds that color with percussive inspiration and he stimulates the imagination on his drum kit. If any criticism is necessary, I would say this piece ends way too soon. I enjoyed the way the ensemble ‘swung’ hard on Ellington’s “Cottontail” tune with Henry Conerway tenacious and formidable on his drums, once given an exciting amount of time to solo and exhibit his technique. All in all, this is a swinging trio, with a nice repertoire and a tight, jazzy, acoustic presentation and sound.

CHARLES PILLOW – ELECTRIC MILES

 

 

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