Jnana-Vijnana (Awake)

The Dan Wilkins Ensemble performs Wilkins’ original compositions, inspired by personal psychological and spiritual experiences.  The album, titled Jnana Vijnana comes from Sanskrit, referring to the pursuit of understanding the knowledge of the Self and of the physical, plural world in its many phases and incarnations.

The ensemble looks to paint imaginative and visceral sonic landscapes, exploring harmonic layering in support of dynamic, lyrical melodies and rhythmic hooks. Featuring: Dan Wilkins on tenor saxophone, Patrick McGee on soprano saxophone, Mike Bono and Vaughn Stoffey on guitars, Dave Lantz and Kevin Bernstein on keyboards, Daryl Johns on bass, and Jimmy Macbride on drumset.

Saxophonist and composer Dan Wilkins is a graduate of Manhattan School of Music’s prestigious jazz program and has studied with some of the foremost educators in jazz including NEA Jazz Master Dave Liebman, Caris Visentin-Liebman, Phil Markowitz, Steve Wilson, Rich Perry and Garry Dial. He has performed throughout the United Sates as well as internationally.

The New York release of Jnana-Vijnana will be celebrated at Cornelia Street Cafe on February 3. 

LEONID AUSKERN
JAZZ QUAD
Their debut album looks like the work of already established masters with a certain worldview.
Read the full review here.

CHRIS SPECTOR
MIDWEST RECORD
Solid work that will grab your ear! Read here. 

JAMES NADAL
ALL ABOUT JAZZ
Dan Wilkins—though young in years and experience—has been successful in not only composing the profound and enlightening music on this record, but in projecting his ideas into his fellow bandmates, each whom played their parts to perfection. This record reflects an understanding of knowledge obtained with a realized perception of the goal achieved. Read the full review here. 

LANCE LIDDLE
BEBOP SPOKEN HERE
A cerebral exercise! Read the full review here.

GEORGE HARRIS
JAZZ WEEKLY
The melding of reeds create a rice pilaf of support while Macbride’s delicate ride cymbal drives the team forward with aplomb. Puts the word “smooth” back into “jazz” in a good sense. Read the full review here.

 
 
 

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